Shaken Baby Syndrome

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Amniotic fluid problems

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Choosing a pre-school

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Newborn reflexes

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Mastitis

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Pelvic floor exercises

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Colic

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  • Shaken Baby Syndrome

    Tuesday, 21 July 2015 16:28
  • Amniotic fluid problems

    Thursday, 14 May 2015 12:54
  • Choosing a pre-school

    Friday, 10 April 2015 17:50
  • Newborn reflexes

    Tuesday, 03 March 2015 15:49
  • Mastitis

    Tuesday, 03 March 2015 15:41
  • Pelvic floor exercises

    Wednesday, 11 February 2015 17:20
  • Colic

    Wednesday, 11 February 2015 17:11
  • Antenatal Classes

    Monday, 03 June 2013 09:34
  • Strap-in-the-Future

    Thursday, 30 June 2011 13:52

Development Summary 2 - 3 Years

Social and emotional development
By 2½ years, children are usually:

Trying hard to be independent, saying ‘no’ a lot, or ‘me do’ (but they are still very dependent on their parents)

Unable to control their feelings; tantrums are common especially when tired or frustrated

Unable to share with others

Starting to play imagination games, such as putting a doll to bed or driving a car around on the floor

There may be a problem if a child:

Is having tantrums very often

Does not play with adults or older children

 

By 3 years, children are usually:

Trying to copy adults, and may be able to be helpful (e.g. help with putting toys away)

Playing lots of imagination games and starting to join in with other children’s play

There may be a problem if a child:

Is not playing imagination games (using toys the way they are ‘meant’ to be used, e.g. pushing a car along a ‘road’ rather than mostly focusing on the wheels)

Is mostly ‘in his own world’ rather than interacting with others

 

Motor development
By 2½ years, children are usually able to:

Climb on and off furniture

Run smoothly and climb on some play equipment

Kick a large ball gently but not usually in the ‘right’ direction

Climb up stairs

Throw a ball in approximately the right direction

There may be problems if a child cannot:

Run smoothly, especially if the child has a limp

A child is not able to safely climb stairs or onto low furniture

 

By 3 years children are usually able to:

Push or pull large toys around to where they want them

Walk alone up and down stairs

Use the pedals on a pedal toy

Stand and walk on tiptoe

Kick a ball forcefully

Throw a ball and catch one on extended arms

There may be a problem if a child:

Is not able to run as smoothly as other children of the same age

Is not climbing skilfully

 

Daily activities
By 2½ years, children are usually:

Able to feed themselves with a spoon and cup

Able to help to dress and undress

Very active, resisting attempts to stop them doing things and have no idea about danger (even if they can say that something is dangerous)

Many, but not all, develop to the stage that they can manage toilet training

There may be a problem if a child:

Is far more active or less active than other children of the same age.

Is not yet managing to feed himself most of the time

 

By 3 years, children are usually:

Able undress and put on some easy-to-use clothes

Able to eat with a spoon and fork

Most, but not all, have reached the stage where they can manage toilet training. Some children will not manage this until they are nearly 4

 

Speech and language
By 2½ years children are usually able to

Use well over 100 recognisable words, but many of the words will be unclear as they cannot say all of the sounds in the words

Put the words into short sentences

Follow simple instructions

Talk during play with more of the words understandable

Let people know what they want using words

There may be a problem if a child:

Is not using words to let others know what they want

Is not talking clearly enough for the primary caregiver to know what they want some of the time

Seems to be in a ‘world of his own’, not responding to the talk of others

 

By 3 years, children are usually able to:

Talk clearly enough that strangers are able to understand at least some of what they are saying

Using words such as ‘me’ and ‘you’ correctly

Ask many questions starting with ‘what’, ‘where’, ‘why’

Listen to stories, demanding favourite stories repeatedly

Making up long stories while playing

There may be a problem if a child

Is not using words to let others know what he wants

Is not talking clearly enough for the primary caregiver to know what he wants most of the time

Seems to be in a ‘world of his own’, not responding to the talk of others

Consult a Doctor if you are worried about your child's development.

 

With thanks/ Reference

Parenting and Child Health Services, South Australia

www.cyh.sa.gov.au